with Love and Squalor

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Snapped a quick photo at Jason’s most recent book signing.  I sat in the back and enjoyed the girls next to me discussing how he was ‘author handsome’.  (I thought that was just my thing, but ok.)  Yesterday The New York Times and NPR called for interviews, and today he’s in Concord doing a radio show.  So cool. 

Snapped a quick photo at Jason’s most recent book signing.  I sat in the back and enjoyed the girls next to me discussing how he was ‘author handsome’.  (I thought that was just my thing, but ok.)  Yesterday The New York Times and NPR called for interviews, and today he’s in Concord doing a radio show.  So cool. 

Jason’s booksigning event tonight was so fun.  It was held in the very cool Goodwin Library in Farmington, NH.  Tons of charm, and being that it’s probably the oldest and largest building in that small town, there was a ‘museum’ tucked away in a room downstairs.  Tons of historical artifacts, natural collections, and stacks of old books and photographs were on display.  We had a blast going through everything before his presentation, and I of course photographed some of the items that appealed me (read: I want them for my own collection).

A collection of amazingly intricate walnut carvings made by a man with one arm.  I am completely serious.



Shilling notes from 1775.  Awesome.












He’s much nicer about posing for pictures with strangers than with me.  Humph.



And I leave you with a good example of why you should remember to set your camera back to autofocus when you hand it over to a stranger.

I’m getting somewhat used to seeing my husband in newspapers and magazines lately, but seeing him on today’s front page with a ZOMBIELAND! headline is pretty neat.

I’m getting somewhat used to seeing my husband in newspapers and magazines lately, but seeing him on today’s front page with a ZOMBIELAND! headline is pretty neat.

If anyone’s in New England (or looking for an excuse to be) - stop by Bookstock 2010 this Saturday in Woodstock, Vermont. My husband’s presenting his new book - The New England Grimpendium - and we’ll have some copies on hand. Come say Hi!

Totally love this author.

Every place in the U.S. has its dark side, but New England’s often seems a few shades darker than most. The region is full of the grim, the gruesome, and the ghastly…and all of it worth visiting for the traveler who dares. The New England Grimpendium: A Guide to Macabre and Ghastly Sites in the Northeast U.S. (Countryman Press, a division of W.W. Norton, New York) catalogs hundreds of macabre sites, attractions, and artifacts, all drawn from the firsthand experiences of J. W. Ocker, who covered 7,000 miles of New England roadway in venturing to these eerie locations. From a visit to the private collection of a demonologist to a midnight jaunt at an insane asylum cemetery to an overnight stay at a murder scene, Ocker leaves no gravestone unturned in his quest to chronicle the dark heart of New England. This morbid travelogue includes locations connected to legendary personalities of the macabre, infamous crimes and tragedies, horror movies, and classic New England monsters, as well as notable cemeteries, tombs, and other memento mori. So if you find your nightmares a bit undernourished or your day trips a bit too sunny, The New England Grimpendium is the guide for you.

www.jwocker.com

Macabre Vermont, The New England Grimpendium - J.W. Ocker introduces his new book, The New England Grimpendium, looking at the darker side of Vermont & nearby areas of New England. He gives us a glimpse of fascinating cemeteries & tombstones, horror movie filming locations, famous personalities of the macabre & classic monsters of the Green Mountain State. For young adults & adults.